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What's Free Prior and Informed Consent?

Pueblo Action Alliance

For all our visual learners check out this great FPIC explainer from organizers at the Pueblo Action Alliance.

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America has never cared about sacred sites

The New Republic

Chaco Canyon. The Black Hills. Bears Ears. Gaylor Ranch. Standing Rock. Mauna Kea. Oak Flat. America, through its founding to its present, has stretched its borders and lined its pockets by desecrating Native American sacred and cultural sites and the land they sat on.

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Why Native Americans struggle to protect their sacred places

The Conversation

Forty years ago Congress passed the American Indian Religious Freedom Act so that Native Americans could practice their faith freely and that access to their sacred sites would be protected. Bears Ears Monument is only one example of the conflict over places of religious value.

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For Native Americans, a river is more than a 'person', it's a sacred place

The Conversation

Native Americans view nature through their belief systems. A river or water does not only sustain life – it is sacred. Indigenous people from around the world share these beliefs about the sacredness of water.

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What makes a mountain, hill or prairie a ‘sacred’ place for Native Americans?

The Conversation

Despite our 200-plus years of contact, the U.S. has yet to begin to understand the uniqueness of Native American religions and ties to the land. And until this happens, there will continue to be conflicts over religious ideas of land and landscape, and what makes a place sacred.

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Why sacred places should matter to everyone

TriplePundit

Sacred lands are more than esoteric, spiritual sanctuaries. These places protect biodiversity. Indigenous people make up 4 percent of the world’s population and control 22 percent of the earth’s surface—and on that land is 80 percent of the planet’s remaining biodiversity.

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Religious Freedoms, Sacred Sites and Human Rights in the United States

University of Colorado Law School

Sacred sites in the U.S. are often located on lands now owned by the federal government. Guarantees of religious freedom in the First Amendment and federal statutes have failed to protect American Indian religious practitioners in cases involving sacred sites on federal public lands.

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Existing Federal Law and the Protection of Sacred Sites: Possibilities and Limitations

Cultural Survival Magazine Quarterly

Western concepts of resource development (logging, mining, tourism) are often inconsistent with the preservation of sacred sites. The goals of those who want to "develop" are more readily incorporated into land management policies and decision-making than are Native religious beliefs.

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Free, Prior, and Informed Consent

Red Road to DC

Native Nations and Indigenous peoples need a seat at the decision-making table in matters dealing with tribal lands, water, and sacred sites.

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